Project lessons from playing pool

A few months ago, I rekindled my enjoyment of the game of pool after having played it sporadically over the past twenty years.

I find something soothing about the clickety-clack sound of balls ricocheting off one another and relish the challenge of figuring out which shot to play to sink a ball and line up my next shot or if I miss, at least prevent others from making their shots.

Racking my brain (pun intended) for a topic to write about this week I thought why not explore whether there are any lessons we can learn from playing pool which might be applicable to project work?

  1. Standard pool is played with fifteen colored balls (not counting the cue ball). Diversity within teams is a source of strength. Yes, it might make the storming and norming phases of team development more challenging, but higher performance, creativity and resilience can be the rewards for persistence.
  2. No two pool tables play exactly the same. Until we understand the unique attributes of a given table, making assumptions based on previous games played on different tables is likely to get us into trouble. With our projects, while historical data can be relevant, we need to understand the specific context of a project to avoid using the wrong tool or technique.
  3. Define the rules of play with your opponents. There are some generally accepted rules for playing pool, but certain practices might vary by who you play with. There are generally applicable principles for project delivery but work with your teams to develop working agreements and ways of delivery which are best suited to them and the needs of the project.
  4. Balance risk with reward. Yes, that tricky bank shot would look impressive to bystanders if you can make it, but if you miss, you might set your opponent up to run the table. But playing it too safe usually won’t work out well either, especially if your opponent has a greater ability than yours! When working on projects, we need to find the right balance between playing it too safe and living on the edge. The former might result in mediocre business outcomes but the latter could result in project failure. This is why having good judgment is critical for project team members.
  5. It takes self-control to do well. It can be really tempting to apply full force on a shot, but you could end up scratching or sinking one of your opponent’s balls. Being mindful about the amount of force required to make a given shot and leaving your ball well positioned for the next shot is important. Delivering challenging projects takes discipline and sloppy execution will hurt us in the short or long term.

Finally, “Take care of your cue ball, and it will take care of you“. Support and lead your team and they will help your project succeed.

 

 

 

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Categories: Project Management | Tags: , , , | 1 Comment

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One thought on “Project lessons from playing pool

  1. Pingback: New PM Articles for the Week of October 22 – 28 | The Practicing IT Project Manager

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